A day in the life - Paddy Campbell

I’ve been working for Dalradian for three years as a geological technician but this isn’t the first time I’ve worked for a gold mining company in Tyrone.

In the late 1980s and early 90s I worked for Omagh Minerals at their gold mine in Cavanacaw. I worked on the drilling rigs there but then left to go to a different job.

It just goes to show that gold mining has been in and around Tyrone for a while now. As a geological technician at Dalradian Gold I am part of the geology team that works on the drill core after it comes in from the exploration site.

We are responsible for identifying areas of strength and weakness in the rock to enable the mine engineers to design a mine that will operate to the highest safety standards. We align and orientate the drill core and then carry out various tests on it before it is passed onto the geologists for evaluation.

Once the geologists have logged the core and identified areas where gold is likely to be found we cut the core in half and organise for samples to be sent to the

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A once in a lifetime opportunity

Dalradian’s proposal to build an underground gold mine in west Tyrone represents a great opportunity for the local area and for Northern Ireland. It will bring a new industry to west Tyrone that builds upon decades of manufacturing and engineering expertise in the wider-county and the mid-Ulster area, providing a major boost for the local economy.

The project is designed to the highest standards, using engineering expertise and the latest construction and mining practices to ensure that the proposed underground gold mine will be environmentally responsible and sympathetic to its local surroundings, while creating 100’s of well paid jobs for the area.

This creates fantastic prospects for young people in a part of Northern Ireland where traditionally many had to go elsewhere to find good work.

The economic stimulus of an underground mine will also create hundreds more jobs indirectly and provide great opportunities for local businesses to grow and new ones to spring up as part of the wider supply chain. A modern mine needs suppliers to service essential equipment, from pumps and forklifts to IT systems and transportation.

Buying locally and employing a local workforce is not only part of being a responsible business but makes economic sense too.

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Our project key facts

Our planning application was submitted over 6 months ago, and through this ongoing series of advertorials, we have continued to communicate the key facts about our project. This article will outline some of the main points of the proposal to build an underground gold mine in west Tyrone.

We are in agreement with many commentators, and political parties in the area, that creating jobs and prosperity in the north west of Northern Ireland should be a key area of policy development, along with the improvement of infrastructure and support for local communities.

We are proud that our project will make a major investment to help address regional economic imbalance, which will also respect and protect the environment. We believe our project can be economically transformative for west Tyrone, creating 350 full-time jobs with an average annual salary of £40,000 and also stimulating businesses and suppliers in the local area by opening up new opportunities. This in turn will create many more jobs through the supply chain and result in an uplift in the local economy.

We are committed to creating more jobs, better jobs, well trained jobs and sustainable jobs. Dalradian is committed to a long-term future in west Tyrone that will bring prosperity to local communities and use best in industry environmental practices. We have outlined our plans in extensive detail in a 10,000 page planning application which was submitted to the Department for Infrastructure in November 2017.

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A day in the life - Oonagh McKenna

I have been working with Dalradian Gold as Community Relations Assistant since April 2015. Mostly it involves liaising with stakeholders at a range of different levels, from landowners to businesses, schools, clubs, and members of the public. So, the varied nature of my role and the opportunity to meet with people for a huge number of reasons daily keeps my job interesting and fresh.

I’d have to say, I’m happiest out on the road working in the local community. Having lived very close to the current exploration site I’ve had personal experience of Dalradian being a good neighbour.

I have worked for most of my life in customer facing roles both in the service and tourism sectors. More recently I worked as a biodiversity guide as I have a keen interest in native flora and fauna. I have seen many advances in my locality in that time, I can remember when houses in my area didn’t have electricity, running water or even landline telephones, resulting in huge depopulation.

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A day in the life - Angela Coney

My life with Dalradian began in early 2011 where we had a small team of 4 based in the Gortin office.

I came from a background in cross border business development promoting cross border business opportunities which later developed to become an all-Island programme. After spending 11 years based in the Enterprise Centre in Omagh I started to look for a change and an opportunity arose within Dalradian Gold.

I was very nervous at first, not knowing anything about the mining industry and I certainly had no knowledge about exploration activities but it was just too exciting not to take the chance.

I started in administration for Dalradian and really that meant doing a little bit of everything. The company began to grow its team and I grew with the company too. Upskilling and employee development are a core element to the company’s business strategy.

Through day release and night classes I have acquired my CIPD qualifications and I am currently working towards additional qualifications. I work now as the HR manager within the company and continuous learning is something that I believe in. At Dalradian Gold we encourage staff to upskill and update their training portfolios and to be the best that they can be. I get great satisfaction from helping others achieve their career development and the company provides full assistance to make this happen.

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A day in the life - Dominic Coyle

I grew up in Garvagh and have a wife and son here, but I’ve spent most of my life working away from Tyrone.

I worked all over the place, in England, Dublin, Australia to name but a few. I’m a shotcreeter by trade, but it’s always been difficult to get work in west Tyrone, at least to get
good work.

In 2011 when the recession was at its worst it was very difficult to make a living.

I was in my 40’s but I took the decision to go to Australia to work. It was a hard move and it meant flying home every month to see my family. In Australia I worked for a month and got a week off, so I’d use that time to fly back home.

In December 2015, I was home for Christmas and approached Dalradian for a job and they said yes. The difference to my life has been night and day. I’m now able to live at home and spend time with my family while working in a job that I love. My career with Dalradian has been great and really interesting.

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A day in the life - Shane Mullin

I started working for Dalradian in 2011 as a placement student. From the start the job was interesting, I always felt I was learning new things.

Last year I finished an MSc in Survey, Land and Environmental Management at the Camborne School of Mines in Exeter. Dalradian funded me for the course (I was cheeky enough to ask their COO for funding in 2016 and he agreed) and now I’m working full-time for the company as a mine surveyor.

No two days are exactly the same, which is one of the things I like best about the job. It’s also very exciting to be involved in such a huge project which will provide a new source of jobs for people here. It’s badly needed in this part of Tyrone and will change the whole county for the better.

One hugely important point about the arrival of Dalradian in Tyrone is the fact that it has allowed a young person like myself to stay at home, and build a skilled, sustainable long term career which just would not have existed otherwise. Many of my school friends, lads I played football with growing up have had to go to England or Australia to look for work. Most of them would never have found a decent job here.

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Help us to grow our local workforce

Late last year we submitted our Planning Application to build an underground gold mine in West Tyrone. As a result, news is spreading about the job and supplier opportunities that will be created by a new industry in Northern Ireland. We expect a review of the application, consultation and the anticipated public inquiry to take 18-24 months, followed by a decision on the application. This means that we could be starting mine construction sometime in the next several years and therefore need to start designing our training programs.

Dalradian’s underground gold mine is projected to operate for a minimum of 20 years and will create at least 350 permanent jobs, with an average salary of £40,000. Consistent with NI employment law, we aim to employ mostly local people from West Tyrone. This area doesn’t have an extensive history of mining although it does have a rich quarrying and mining equipment/ engineering industry. The primary occupations in the area are farming and construction, which are also good backgrounds for entering the mining industry.

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Building a tourist attraction

Recently we welcomed our 1000th visitor to our tunnel tours, which have been running since 2016.

The tours, which highlight health and safety, engineering and geology aspects of the proposed mine, have been universally praised by those who have taken the tour, with many describing it as a once in a lifetime experience.

When the mine is up and running, we will broaden the tour, with further explanation of the geological history of the area, and the economic potential of mining for the people of Tyrone. Mining tourism is a well established economic driver for many areas across the world, and we believe that the opening o the Curraghinalt mine can have a significant positive tourism impact in the Sperrins.

Indeed here on the island of Ireland, in Derreenavoggy, Co. Roscommon, the Arigna mining tours have been running since 2003 and have welcomed more than a quarter of a million visitors since then. The tours offer people the chance to go underground and see the last working coal mine in Ireland, which closed in 1990, and be guided by former miners.

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Connecting with Tyrone businesses

Our proposed underground gold mine in west Tyrone will employ more than 350 people full-time, once operational.

But the economic benefits of the mine go beyond those directly employed by Dalradian and spread out to companies and businesses in west Tyrone and indeed across Northern Ireland.

A modern underground gold mine and the operations associated with it require a range of services, skills and suppliers. We will need people to service and supply equipment including piping, pumps, electrical equipment and scissor lifts to name just a few.

On top of that Dalradian will also require concrete and shotcrete as we construct and maintain the underground mine. Transporting material and equipment around the site also requires vehicles such as pick-up trucks and loaders and these vehicles will need to be supplied with fuel and of course maintained by skilled mechanics.

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Ireland's golden age continues

The history of gold in Ireland goes back millennia and beyond, with ancient tribes noted for their artistry in fashioning Celtic jewellery.

Ireland’s relationship with gold stretches back as far as 2000 BC. The National Museum of Ireland has a collection of gold works uncovered in various digs, making the hoard one of the most impressive in Europe.

The Celts made gold brooches to signify authority. Torcs were also important in Celtic goldwork and could sometimes symbolise Gods and aspects of Celtic mythology. In the past it was believed that the gold worked by the Celts came from continental Europe, however some historians believe the precious metal may have come from the Mourne Mountains.

A 14-year-long study by archaeologists and geologists, which ended in 2009, concluded that early Irish Bronze Age ornaments were “not only made of Irish gold but probably of gold from Co. Down’s Mourne Mountains.”

That partly explains why more Bronze Age gold finds have been made in Ireland than in any other country.

Dalradian as a company takes its name from a `super group of rocks’ that were formed up to 1,000 million years ago. The rocks contained underground at Curraghinalt are somewhere between 545 million years and 1,000 million years old, making them some of the oldest rocks on the island of Ireland.

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Support opportunity in Tyrone

Irish News, detailing the impact of a gold mine in a Canadian town, in which a Dalradian investor, Sean Roosen, was involved: "That investment transformed the town from a place with 45% unemployment to one where almost half residents now work in the mine due to the creation of 800 full-time jobs."

Belfast Telegraph, March 2018 "The Northern Ireland mining sector has untapped potential that could transform the economy, an international conference has heard."

HOW YOU CAN HELP SUPPORT OUR APPLICATION:

If you support our plans to build a mine and believe it will be economically transformative for west Tyrone while respecting the environment, express your support to DfI. You will want to include the specific reasons you support the application.

You can do this via our Build a Support Letter tool.

Alternately, you may write directly to DfI by email at planning@infrastructure-ni.gov.uk referencing LA10/2017/1249/F or by post at:

Strategic Planning
Division, First Floor,
Clarence Court
10-18 Adelaide Street,
Belfast, BT2 8GB

or

Chief Planner’s Office,
71 Ebrington Square,
Derry-Londonderry,
BT47 6FA

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Our plans to protect the environment

All mines have a finite lifespan, and planning for what happens to a site when production is over is crucial. As such, planning for the time, decades from now, when we are winding down our operation is as important as planning to begin mining. Dalradian takes its responsibility to the social, economic and environmental sustainability of the eco system and the local community extremely seriously.

Dalradian estimates the lifespan of our proposed mine at Curraghinalt in west Tyrone to be between 20 and 25 years. We have planned extensively for what should happen to the mine when it is closed and this forms an important and lengthy part of our planning application.

Over the past number of years we listened to stakeholders and the general public’s view on how the site should be treated when the mine has closed, and these opinions have influenced our plans. A financial guarantee has been proposed as part of our application, which means money will always be available to carry out all of the necessary closure works.

We have designed our proposed mine so that post-closure the site will be restored for productive use for farming and/ or heathlands. Our design allows for progressive restoration of the site, even as operations continue.

After production has stopped the final landform of the site has been designed to ensure it will tie in with the surrounding natural slopes of the adjacent ridge and Owenreagh Valley. All mineral processing related infrastructure will be removed and mined areas will have been backfilled with waste rock and tailings from the process which has been treated to ensure they are environmentally safe and in keeping with legislative requirements.

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Consultation Period Extended

Mining is a living industry on the island of Ireland, providing work for thousands and contributing billions to the economy of the Republic of Ireland. Indeed an independent report shows that in 2017 the geoscience sector in Ireland was worth €3.3 billion to the economy in the Republic.

This includes 15,110 people directly employed in the sector and a further 9,628 people employed indirectly and through induced employment in areas such as geo-tourism, geo-heritage, groundwater, extractive industries and geoscience research. Across the Republic, towns and villages have benefited from the minerals sector, with Navan, home to Europe’s largest zinc mine, being the best example.

The Department for Infrastructure has now extended the deadline for the public consultation until April 19th 2018.

If you support our plans to build an underground mine and believe it will add to the economy of west Tyrone and beyond, while respecting the environment, express your support to DfI. You can do this via our “Build a Support Letter” tool at Build a Letter of Support. Alternately, you may write directly to DfI by email at planning@infrastructure-ni.gov.uk referencing LA10/2017/1249/F.

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A range of skills required

"Friends of Omagh High School applied to Dalradian Gold Limited Community Fund and was awarded £4,419 towards a community computer facility.

A spokesperson for the committee said: Omagh High School incorporates the technological use of
computers and mobile devices in the classroom to further the academic abilities of pupils.

It also acknowledges growing trends of a technologically driven society that relies on computers to perform daily tasks.

However, the cost of these growing trends in technology is a serious consideration for all schools. The committee is very grateful of the generous award."

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Support Opportunity in Tyrone

The formal stakeholder consultation process on our planning application to build an underground gold mine will be ending soon after the advert was placed by the Department for Infrastructure (DfI) in local papers across Tyrone.

The ad summarized the main aspects of the proposal and invites members of the public to give their opinion on the regionally significant application. Letters have also been sent by DfI to members of the public who live in the surrounding area of the proposed mine to inform them about how to access the application and submit their views on the proposal to the department. DfI will also request comments on the application from statutory and non-statutory consultees, which includes the Department of Agriculture Environment and Rural Affairs (DAERA), Road Service, NI Water, the Department for Environment, Public Health Agency, Ulster Angling Federation, Friends of the Earth and others.

Our proposal is to build an underground gold mine that will create more than 350 full-time jobs, with an average salary of £40,000. Local businesses will benefit from spending of $1 billion over the life time of the mine.

Equally, there are many ways to reduce these potential impacts. During the construction and operation of the mine, workers will car-share and use park and ride services to attend site. Shifts will be staggered to avoid traffic build up at particular peak-times, such as during school runs.

Our proposed development will access the main road network via the B46 (Crockanboy Road). This road has a traffic capacity of some 13,000 vehicles per day.

As part of our planning process, independent experts examined the impact to local communities of a rise in the number of vehicles on the road network, especially around the villages of Greencastle, Rouskey and Gortin.

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Traffic and Transport - Our plans

Traffic can be one of the more immediate impacts from any new development. This can be either during the construction phase (deliveries to the site and site workers) or the operating phase (mainly employees), or both.

Equally, there are many ways to reduce these potential impacts. During the construction and operation of the mine, workers will car-share and use park and ride services to attend site. Shifts will be staggered to avoid traffic build up at particular peak-times, such as during school runs.

Our proposed development will access the main road network via the B46 (Crockanboy Road). This road has a traffic capacity of some 13,000 vehicles per day.

As part of our planning process, independent experts examined the impact to local communities of a rise in the number of vehicles on the road network, especially around the villages of Greencastle, Rouskey and Gortin.

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Canada's mining experience generates thriving communities

In Canada, gold mining is a well-established and regulated industry, adding almost CDN$60 billion to the economy in 2015 and helping bring prosperity to communities across the country.

The Abitibi region, about 300 miles north-west of Montreal, is one of the richest areas in Canada for gold deposits and is geologically similar to Northern Ireland and Scotland. Since 1901, the region has been home to around 100 mines and has produced more than 170 million ounces of gold.

But the Abitibi region isn’t just home to gold fields, it is also renowned for its scenery and is a popular destination for fishing and hunting, with a tourist industry built up around those activities.

For more than 100 years, gold mining has taken place in an area of natural beauty and pristine fishing lakes, allowing both the mining sector and tourism to flourish side-by-side. Many of the mines are located next to towns and approximately 1 in 6 local people are directly employed by the mining industry, with at least one indirect job created for each direct job.

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Supporting the community in West Tyrone

The formal stakeholder consultation process on our planning application to build an underground gold mine commenced last week with the advert placed by the Department
for Infrastructure (DfI) in local papers across Tyrone.

The ad summarizes the main aspects of the proposal and invites members of the public to give their opinion on the regionally significant application. Letters have also been sent by DfI to members of the public who live in the surrounding area of the proposed mine to inform
them about how to access the application and submit their views on the proposal to the department.

Click here to Support Opportunity in Tyrone

DfI will also request comments on the application from statutory and non-statutory consultees, which includes the Department of Agriculture Environment and Rural Affairs (DAERA) and other regulatory organisations.

A great mine needs great people

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Supporting the community in West Tyrone

The formal stakeholder consultation process on our planning application to build an underground gold mine commenced last week with the advert placed by the Department
for Infrastructure (DfI) in local papers across Tyrone.

The ad summarizes the main aspects of the proposal and invites members of the public to give their opinion on the regionally significant application. Letters have also been sent by DfI to members of the public who live in the surrounding area of the proposed mine to inform
them about how to access the application and submit their views on the proposal to the department.

Click here to Support Opportunity in Tyrone

DfI will also request comments on the application from statutory and non-statutory consultees, which includes the Department of Agriculture Environment and Rural Affairs (DAERA) and other regulatory organisations.

A great mine needs great people

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Supporting the community in West Tyrone

Community, cultural, social, sporting and environmental groups and clubs play a pivotal role in any local area. So do local schools and further education colleges. In recognition of the vital work these groups undertake every day, Dalradian is committed to providing funding and to volunteering on local projects in west Tyrone.

We began work on the Curraghinalt Gold Project in 2010 and since then, from modest beginnings, we have supported the local community in a variety of ways.

In the early days, we assisted some local community and sporting groups financially, our staff helped at festivals and fundraising events and we identified environmental projects where our help was needed. Over the years we have continued our involvement with these projects to maximise the benefit of our help and donations.

In 2015, Dalradian established the Tyrone Fund. Since then we have donated almost £270,000 to a range of sporting clubs, community and cultural groups and sporting organisations. Our funding has supported local churches, local community and farming associations, schools and sporting clubs and environmental projects.

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An underground mine designed to blend in

We are committed to building a mine that is modern, safe and environmentally responsible.

Ensuring that the landscape is preserved and maintained is a core focus of our planning application. All mining at the Curraghinalt gold deposit will take place underground.

There will not be any “open pits”, which is a type of mining that is much more visible, noisy and dusty. That means that disruption to the landscape around the villages of Gortin, Greencastle and Rousky will be kept to a minimum.

View from Crockanboy Road currently View from Crockanboy Road at end of the mine’s life
View from Mullaghcarn currently View from Mullaghcarn at end of the mine’s life
During operations, almost all of the activity will take place underground.

On surface, operations will be housed in buildings that are designed to blend in with the rural character of the area and will be removed once mining is complete. In addition, we will be storing crushed rock from our processing operations in a dry stack facility (see advertorial from week of February 5), which is safer and allows us to rehabilitate the land as we go. Below are
pictures from several local viewpoints showing the current landscape around our proposed
underground mine and how it will look when operations cease.

A great mine needs great people

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A great mine needs great people

Dalradian is committed to building a mine that is modern, safe and environmentally responsible. A “best in class” operation, globally. We often get asked what the visual impact of the operation will be at our proposed site between Greencastle and Rouskey. Even though we are building an underground gold mine there will be some operations on the surface. These include a water treatment plant, processing plant, workshop, mine rescue building, administrative offices and a dry stack tailings facility.

What are dry stack tailings?
The short answer is crushed rock that resembles a ‘damp sand’. As part of the mining process, rock is taken from underground and then crushed and ground until it is the size of sand. The crushed rock with gold is separated out, and some of the crushed rock with no gold is pressed to remove most of the water and built into the shape of a hill near to the mill (dry stack tailings). The rest of it is returned underground.

The material with no gold is produced by physical processes only and has been extensively tested to prove its safety. The dry stack will also contain some intact rock with no gold, which will be layered with the crushed rock to form a stable structure.

The planning application for the regionally significant project runs to more than 10,000 pages and includes almost 40 detailed reports by experts from internationally recognised environmental consulting firms.

A large part of the application concerns the environment and the measures which we will take to build a safe gold mine. As part of our application we have outlined how we will implement stringent, best practice environmental monitoring and mitigation measures which meet or exceed regulatory requirements.

A gold mine in west Tyrone will be economically transformative for the area. An independent feasibility study has shown that more than 350 full-time, permanent jobs will be created once the mine is fully operational.

Consultation on Gold Mine plans starting soon

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A great mine needs great people

On 27 November 2017 Dalradian submitted a planning application (LA10/2017/1249/F) to the Department for Infrastructure (DfI) to build an underground gold mine at the Curraghinalt deposit between Rouskey and Greencastle.

The planning application for the regionally significant project runs to more than 10,000 pages and includes almost 40 detailed reports by experts from internationally recognised environmental consulting firms.

A large part of the application concerns the environment and the measures which we will take to build a safe gold mine. As part of our application we have outlined how we will implement stringent, best practice environmental monitoring and mitigation measures which meet or exceed regulatory requirements.

A gold mine in west Tyrone will be economically transformative for the area. An independent feasibility study has shown that more than 350 full-time, permanent jobs will be created once the mine is fully operational.

In addition, $1 billion will be spent over the lifetime of the mine, providing opportunities for local businesses in Tyrone and across Northern Ireland. Last week, DfI finished uploading all of the documents forming this extensive application
(approximately 100 in total).

Consultation on Gold Mine plans starting soon

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A great mine needs great people

At Dalradian, we are always looking for great people. Our proposed gold mine at the Curraghinalt deposit between Rouskey and Greencastle will create 350 permanent direct jobs for West Tyrone while operating to the highest environmental standards.
Having submitted our planning application last month, we have launched a careers section on our website at www.dalradianni.com/careers/. The information that we gather will assist us in assessing interest and skills levels as we refine our plans for employment and training at the mine. Over the past 8 years of operating our exploration site at the Curraghinalt gold deposit we have been fortunate to work with many people from County Tyrone, who come from a diverse range of backgrounds. The new careers section now means it’s easier for people to contact us and tell us what type of job they would be interested in.

The new section contains 20 different job types under five different categories and allows you to contact us by selecting which type of job you are interested in and providing contact details. You can also send us a CV and a covering letter through the careers section to tell us a bit more about your skills and experience. Your name will be added to our jobs update email list and you will automatically hear about any current job searches.

The application has taken several years to complete and is informed by the multiple engagements and public consultations we have held with the communities in Greencastle, Rouskey, Gortin and beyond over the past two years. These engagements were held not only to give you a broad overview of our project and the chance to ask questions, but to tell us what you like and don’t like about our plans. Your opinions helped shape our final planning application.

World-class mine

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World-class mine

Last week we submitted our planning application to build a gold mine at the Curraghinalt deposit between Rouskey and Greencastle. The application runs to more than 10,000 pages and includes nearly 40 detailed reports by independent experts from internationally recognised environmental consulting firms.

The application has taken several years to complete and is informed by the multiple engagements and public consultations we have held with the communities in Greencastle, Rouskey, Gortin and beyond over the past two years. These engagements were held not only to give you a broad overview of our project and the chance to ask questions, but to tell us what you like and don’t like about our plans. Your opinions helped shape our final planning application.

A large part of our application concerns the environmental impacts of our project and mitigation measures, from opening to closure. We address topics such as air quality and noise, water, health, ecology, economics, landscape and visual, traffic, closure and reclamation. We are building a safe project and all of our processes have been designed to meet or exceed regulatory requirements.

Now that the application has been submitted with all of the detailed and finalised plans for the project, consultation enters a new phase. The public, planning consultees and

We're listening: add your voice to the planning process

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World-class mine

After seven years of exploration, engineering and environmental studies, earlier this week Dalradian Gold lodged a planning application for a gold mine in Tyrone.
Over the coming period people will have the opportunity to comment on our proposals.

This project has the potential to transform the local economy West of the Bann and will be done so according to the highest environmental standards.
Our planning application runs to approximately 100 documents and will be subjected to a rigorous planning process.

Full details of the application will be available shortly at www.planningni.gov.uk

Jobs in Tyrone

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Innovative approaches for protecting the environment

Storing mine waste safely and responsibly is a top priority for Dalradian Resources and a fundamental part of the planning application for our proposed gold mine at Curraghinalt in west Tyrone.

Most of the waste from the mining process, consisting largely of uneconomic rock and processed ore, will be stored underground in keeping with a key objective of the EU Mining Waste Directive and to minimise disruption to the local landscape.

A small proportion of waste rock and ore which has been processed solely through physical means – including crushing, grinding and flotation, the
industry term is “flotation tailings” – will be stored on the surface.

We plan to manage the surface disposal of this waste material using a method known as dry stack tailings. This approach has many advantages over older methods and is widely recognized as a best practice in the mining industry.

Historically, mines around the world have used use wet tailings systems, which involve large areas enclosed by dams or berms, with the tailings deposited
behind these in a slurry. There are examples, some quite recent, of tailings dam failures, some of which have caused significant environmental damage.

World-class Mine

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A clear commitment to clean water

At Dalradian Gold, we understand that careful resource management is essential to the success of our business.

That’s why at our current exploration site, we often go beyond regulatory requirements for environmental protection.

This high level of care is also demonstrated in our plans for a future mine at Curraghinalt, which includes a state-of-the-art water treatment facility.

World-class Mine

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A new $1 Billion industry for Tyrone

Dalradian’s project represents a great opportunity for Tyrone, a county with a strong history of mineral extraction, manufacturing and engineering.

Some of the world’s leading mineral and construction material handling equipment manufacturers are based in Tyrone and a gold mine in the county is a great fit for the skills, know-how and experience that already exist there.

I am sure that building on that collective experience, Dalradian’s gold mine will be a major boost to the economy in Tyrone and indeed for the whole of the west of the Bann.

Gordon Best, Regional Director of Quarry Products Association Northern Ireland

World-class Mine Jobs in Tyrone

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A Great mine needs great people

Dalradian Gold has been exploring its high-grade Curraghinalt gold deposit since 2009 and will be submitting a planning application shortly to build a mine at Curraghinalt. Currently, we have nearly 100 people working in different occupations at our exploration site and our Omagh and satellite offices. The largest employer in the area, we use local suppliers and accommodation providers where possible, supporting other jobs locally. As our project moves forward, the number and type of high-quality jobs supported by Dalradian will more than triple.

Our jobs cannot be moved offshore because the gold we intend to mine – a deposit of more than four million ounces – is located right here in Tyrone. As soon as our planning application is approved, two years of construction will begin, directly employing 300 people. Once we begin operations, our direct workforce will grow to 350 or more, and span a broad range of occupations and backgrounds.

Gold mining depends upon a diverse range of skill-sets, many of which are found in the people and professions of Tyrone. Where there is a lack of experience we will provide appropriate further training and work with local institutions to bolster the skills needed for this burgeoning new industry.

We will hire heavy equipment mechanics, welders, drivers, equipment operators, millwrights, electricians, crusher operators, blasters and more. These jobs are essential to the operation of a mine; and while most will require good GCSE grades, NVQs or BTECs, or relevant work experience, they won’t require a degree.

Creating 350 jobs in County Tyrone

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Dalradian - Helping to protect the pearl mussel

Dalradian is proud to assist local community and conservation groups in safeguarding the environment.

A priority is keeping the rivers and waterways clean to protect the freshwater pearl mussel, an endangered species found in Co. Tyrone.

Freshwater pearl mussels are nature’s litmus test for the cleanliness and purity of our rivers and streams. Formerly abundant in Europe and a common sight in Northern Irish waters this ancient mollusc is now classified as a critically endangered species. Only six populations remain in Northern Ireland and three – in the Ballinderry, the Owenkillew and Owenreagh Rivers – are in County Tyrone.

Historically, freshwater pearl mussels were over-harvested by pearl fishers. In addition, the mollusc’s complex life-cycle makes it vulnerable to environmental change and impacts
related to agriculture.

For the first nine months of its life, the freshwater pearl mussel attaches to the gills of young salmon and trout, before detaching and burrowing underneath the gravel beds of rivers and streams. Therefore, both a healthy fish population and a clean water system are essential for its survival.

The mollusc lives underneath a riverbed for its first four years, where it feeds on algae. During this critical phase, too much silt and sediment in the water will deprive the mussel of oxygen, and potentially cause suffocation or poisoning.

A clear commitment to clean water

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Creating opportunities for business in Tyrone

Today, there are more than 100 people working on Dalradian Gold’s project in west Tyrone. Most are from the local community and live locally. We are proud to employ local people and, as we look to the future, are extremely fortunate to have such a motivated and skilled workforce here in Tyrone.

Across Northern Ireland we have spent more than £15 million in the same period. That figure excludes a further £12 million in salaries paid.

We also have thriving relationships with local suppliers and businesses – a diverse group that includes fuel, accommodation and food providers, transport companies and skilled tradespeople, like electricians, mechanics and welders.

Since Dalradian took over the exploration project at Curraghinalt, we have spent almost £1.5 million with local suppliers based in the Gortin, Rouskey and Greencastle areas alone.

In county Tyrone we have spent an additional £2.3 million with suppliers, businesses and entrepreneurs, bringing our total spend in the county to £3.8 million over the period.

This is evidence of our commitment and relationships with businesses in county Tyrone and indeed across the region.

Creating prospects for suppliers

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A clear commitment to clean water

The Curraghinalt exploration infrastructure site became active in 2014. From the start, in agreement with statutory bodies, we established a stringent environmental protection framework to ensure we maintain – and enhance, where possible – the integrity of the local environment.

Currently, water from the exploration site is released under a water discharge consent from the Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA), which governs flow and 16 different aspects of water quality, including sediment and pH balance. The consent specifies a maximum sediment content of 50mg per litre; the sediment content in the water we discharge is typically less than 10mg per litre.

We can achieve this because of our on-site, multi-stage water purification system, which includes storage/settlement tanks and a clarifier. The system continuously monitors sediment levels prior to discharge and will automatically shut down any discharge if the maximum levels are approached.

The Owenkillew River near our site is designated as a Special Area of Conservation, which makes water discharge management a key priority. The river contains several protected species including the freshwater pearl mussel, which is very responsive to sediment levels.

Working to protect our natural resources

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The economic benefits of gold mining

For communities located near gold deposits, independent research, using examples from around the world, shows that mining brings investment, employment, training and local spending. Studies confirm that, on average around 90% of the employees working at gold mines are drawn from local communities; in mines operating in Canada and the United States, developed economies similar to Northern Ireland, that figure jumps to more than 95%. Hiring as many workers as possible from the local area concentrates the benefits of the project in the communities closest to the mine and also reduces employee turnover rates.

Experience demonstrates that the benefits of mining also extend well beyond the mine site. In established economies, for every job at the mine, twice as many people are employed indirectly –working for suppliers and enterprises that support the mine. So, it’s not surprising that 70% of the total expenditures by gold mining companies go toward payments to suppliers, contractors and employees.

In addition to jobs, mines provide their employees with training and skills they can use for a lifetime, usually across a range of industries.

At the majority of mines in developed economies, employee training is ongoing throughout the year and represents a substantial investment by the mine operators. For our proposed mine in County Tyrone, the annual training expenditure will be in the range of £1.5 million. During the first three years, we will spend more than £6 million.

Creating a wealth of opportunities

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